VINTAGE POINT: Farmington From Above

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In 1930s Farmington, much of the area outside the immediate downtown–like the neighborhood between Grand River (at center) and Freedom–was still open land.

See the then-and-now slider here.

Historic photo from Brian Golden/Heritage & History Center. Contemporary image from Bing.com maps. Special thanks to Paul Sewick for cropping and aligning the maps.

VINTAGE POINT is Preservation Farmington’s photo column, featuring an exclusive focus on Farmington history: a look at our city through the lens of time. Look for Vintage Point every other week in the Farmington Observer and Farmington Voice and on our Facebook and Twitter pages. We also keep an archive of all past issues on our website under the Vintage Point tab.

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VINTAGE POINT: Old Town Hall

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A hundred years ago, the Masonic Lodge (23715 Farmington Road) doubled as Farmington Township Hall. It also hosted talent shows, lectures, Eastern Star dances, political meetings, and basketball games—although some council members thought the games shouldn’t be allowed, as the basketball sometimes crashed into the electric lights. In summer, a band played on the lawn every Saturday night.

Check out the then-and-now slider here.

Historic photo from the Farmington Community Library Heritage Room. Contemporary photo by Maria Taylor.

 VINTAGE POINT is Preservation Farmington’s photo column, featuring an exclusive focus on Farmington history: a look at our city through the lens of time. Look for Vintage Point every other week in the Farmington Observer and Farmington Voice and on our Facebook and Twitter pages. We also keep an archive of all past issues on our website under the Vintage Point tab.

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VINTAGE POINT: Buck’s Liquors

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A view of the north side of Grand River in the 1940s. John Cowley & Sons pub was Buck’s Liquors. To the right, next to the Farmington Civic Theater, was a sandwich shop.

Historic photo from the Farmington Community Library Heritage Room. Contemporary photo by Maria Taylor.

VINTAGE POINT is Preservation Farmington’s photo column, featuring an exclusive focus on Farmington history: a look at our city through the lens of time. Look for Vintage Point every other week in the Farmington Observer and Farmington Voice and on our Facebook and Twitter pages. We also keep an archive of all past issues on our website under the Vintage Point tab.

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VINTAGE POINT: Farmington’s first newspaper

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The Farmington Enterprise (a predecessor to the Farmington Observer) published its first edition on Nov. 2, 1888. This photo shows its office prior to 1926, when the building was razed and rebuilt on the same site (Farmington Road, just south of Grand River). It’s no longer a news office today, but you can still read the work they printed there: visit farmlib.org/local-history.

See the then-and-now slider here.

Historic photo from the Farmington Community Library Heritage Room. Contemporary photo by Maria Taylor.

VINTAGE POINT is Preservation Farmington’s photo column, featuring an exclusive focus on Farmington history: a look at our city through the lens of time. Look for Vintage Point every other week in the Farmington Observer and Farmington Voice and on our Facebook and Twitter pages. We also keep an archive of all past issues on our website under the Vintage Point tab.

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VINTAGE POINT: Farmington State Savings Bank

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Farmington State Savings Bank (now the Village Mall) opened at Grand River and Farmington Road on March 18, 1922. The lobby was marble and walnut, and the vault door weighed more than 10,000 pounds.

See the then-and-now slider here.

Historic photo from the Farmington Community Library Heritage Room. Contemporary photo by Maria Taylor.

VINTAGE POINT is Preservation Farmington’s photo column, featuring an exclusive focus on Farmington history: a look at our city through the lens of time. Look for Vintage Point every other week in the Farmington Observer and Farmington Voice and on our Facebook and Twitter pages. We also keep an archive of all past issues on our website under the Vintage Point tab.

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VINTAGE POINT: Doc’s office/Los Tres Amigos

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This house, now demolished, at the site of Los Tres Amigos (33200 Grand River) was once the offices of Drs. E.F. Holcomb, Joseph Norton, and Maynard Whitehead, per a note in the Farmington Community Library Heritage Room’s digital archives.

See the then-and-now slider here.

Historic photo from the Farmington Community Library Heritage Room. Contemporary photo by Maria Taylor.

VINTAGE POINT is Preservation Farmington’s photo column, featuring an exclusive focus on Farmington history: a look at our city through the lens of time. Look for Vintage Point every other week in the Farmington Observer and Farmington Voice and on our Facebook and Twitter pages. We also keep an archive of all past issues on our website under the Vintage Point tab.

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VINTAGE POINT: Peoples State Bank

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The Peoples State Bank at 33312 Grand River (now Edward Jones Investments) opened in 1918 and closed during the Depression. For years, it served as Farmington’s city hall. “The clerk’s office is in the Farmington State Bank, the treasurer’s office depends on convenience, and the Commission meets in the basement,” reported the Farmington Enterprise in 1935.

Click here for the then-and-now slider.

Historic photo from the Farmington Community Library Heritage Room. Contemporary photo by Maria Taylor.

VINTAGE POINT is Preservation Farmington’s photo column, featuring an exclusive focus on Farmington history: a look at our city through the lens of time. Look for Vintage Point every other week in the Farmington Observer and Farmington Voice and on our Facebook and Twitter pages. We also keep an archive of all past issues on our website under the Vintage Point tab.

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VINTAGE POINT: Eagle Mill

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Eagle Mill was built in the mid-1800s by Arthur Power. The mill came down in 1923, but the street is still called Power Road. Today, the mill site is a parking lot for the Shiawassee Park tennis courts, across from Valley View Circle.

Click here for a then-and-now slider.

Historic photo from the Farmington Community Library Heritage Room. Contemporary photo by Maria Taylor.

VINTAGE POINT is Preservation Farmington’s photo column, featuring an exclusive focus on Farmington history: a look at our city through the lens of time. Look for Vintage Point every other week in the Farmington Observer and Farmington Voice and on our Facebook and Twitter pages. We also keep an archive of all past issues on our website under the Vintage Point tab.

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VINTAGE POINT: Clang, clang, clang went the trolley

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An old shot looking west along Grand River shows the interurban tracks that once ran through downtown Farmington.

NEW FEATURE: Have some fun with our interactive then-and-now slider at this link.

Historic photo from the Farmington Community Library Heritage Room. Contemporary photo by Maria Taylor.

VINTAGE POINT is Preservation Farmington’s photo column, featuring an exclusive focus on Farmington history: a look at our city through the lens of time. Look for Vintage Point every other week in the Farmington Observer and Farmington Voice and on our Facebook and Twitter pages. We also keep an archive of all past issues on our website under the Vintage Point tab.

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LECTURE: House-spotting, September 21

2015-07-30 19.59.10Maybe you love old houses—restoring them, living in them, touring them, photographing them. Or maybe you’ve walked through the Farmington Historic District so many times that you can identify the houses by color: the blue one on Warner, at the end of Oakland, or the orange one on Grand River, across from the Warner Mansion.

But do you know their names? Can you spot the differences between a Queen Anne and an American Foursquare, or a Storybook and a Craftsman?

How to identify local Farmington-area architectural styles will be the focus of the first in a series of three history-themed lectures by Preservation Farmington, to be held 7 p.m. on Wednesday, September 21 at the Heritage and History Center in Heritage Park. Admission is $5, payable at the door, and free for Preservation Farmington members.

2016-02-20-14-31-17Just like clothing, architectural styles change according to tastes, the political climate, and new expressions of creativity. Speaker Jena Stacey will give a virtual tour of the neighborhoods, showing photos of local Farmington/Farmington Hills architecture—both well-known and obscure—to illustrate how building styles have changed since the 1800s and created the community we know today.

Stacey holds a master’s degree in historic preservation from Eastern Michigan University. She is a co-founder of Preservation Farmington and former member of the Farmington Historical Commission.

The lecture series will continue with “Kit Houses in Metro Detroit” on October 6 and “Researching your Historic Home” on December 7.

Preservation Farmington is a local community advocacy group dedicated to preserving and protecting the historic architecture that defines downtown Farmington. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for the latest local-history news and updates.

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